Idiom "All over the place" - English from the World Cup 2018 - (10 example sentences)


English idiom - All over the place

2018 FIFA World Cup.svg
By Source, Fair use, Link


The World Cup is a big event!
This year's tournament will have 64 matches and they will be played in 12 stadiums in 11 cities across Russia. The matches will be played all over the country!

All over the place English idiom

The English Idiom "All over the place" has 2 meanings that you will learn how to use in this blog post.


All over the place - meaning #1

everywhere; over a great distance or area.

"Starbucks has become very popular in Tokyo. New cafes are opening all over the place."
= There are Starbucks cafes everywhere now.

"As my friends got older they moved away from my hometown. Now they're all over the place and I don't see them much."
= My friends live a great distance from me (far away and in different places)


Learn the English idiom all over the place


All over the place - meaning #2

 not neat; not well organized

"Your desk is a mess! You've got files all over the place. How can you find anything?"
= Your desk is not clean, it must be difficult to find a specific file.

"Trevor's presentation was hard to follow. His ideas were all over the place."
= His ideas were not organized well, his presentation was not clear.


Learn the English idiom all over the place

For meaning ① the word place has a general feeling, it means everywhere. It's also okay to use a specific area name instead of the word place. Remember my first example:


"The matches will be played all over the country!"

In this sentence, instead of saying the place I said the country. The feeling is the same but the place is not so general, it means Russia. The matches will be played all over Russia."

Please look at these other examples:

"Starbucks has become very popular in Tokyo. New cafes are opening all over the city." 

"As my friends got older they moved away from my hometown. Now they're all over the state and I don't see them much."

For meaning ② all over the place can also be used to describe a state of mind (the condition of your mind) to mean confused or unclear. Often someone is thinking about too many things at once, and they can't to focus.

A: "Dave, did you hear what I just said?"
B: "Sorry I missed it. My mind is all over the place today."
= It's hard to focus so I didn't hear what you said.

Do you understand the idiom all over the place now?
Please write your own example sentence in the comments below!



Learn the English idiom All over the place
There are elections signs all over the place 
in my neighborhood. It doesn't look very nice. 
I'll be glad when the election is over!


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⚽The 2018 World Cup is starting soon!  Will you watch it? 
πŸ†Let's learn some #English from the World Cup! 
❓Do you know how to use the verb “QUALIFY?” 
 πŸ“šLearn 4 uses with 15 natural sentence examples!
https://808english.blogspot.com/2018/06/world-cup-english-vocabulary-qualify.html


5 Phrasal verbs using GO!
πŸ’¬Lots of natural examples that you can use 
πŸ“ΊWatch the video as you read the blog post 
πŸ‘‚Great listening practice!

http://808english.blogspot.com/2017/11/5-phrasal-verbs-used-with-go-video.html


Special thanks to  https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/all+over+the+place
for their useful idiom definition!

All FIFA 2018 World Cup information from
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_FIFA_World_Cup



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English Idiom - You get what you pay for! + Adverbs of probability (2018!)

English idiom You get what you pay for

In this English blog post I want to teach you some helpful English that I taught to one of my private students here in Japan. The content of this post is from a real lesson, a natural conversation with some useful English grammar and expressions. Natural English, from a native speaking teacher is the best way to learn. 


Video is HERE! 


πŸ’²
My student and I were talking about cheap products, clothes and other items that are very inexpensive.

inexpensive - adjective - not costing a lot of money (not expensive)

“My student and I were talking about cheap products, clothes and other items that are very inexpensive.”

The prefix in~ can be used to change the meaning of some adjectives to their opposite


in expensive = inexpensive

use the adjective inexpensive

incomplete - not having everything that it should have; not finished or not complete
“The study is still incomplete after 7 years of research.”

 inaccurate - not exact or not accurate; with mistakes
“We got lost a lot on our trip to Mexico. Our map was terribly inaccurate.”
↞↠
I'm from Canada, I used to live in a town near Toronto. 

Toronto

 We had many stores called “dollar stores,” everything in these stores cost $1. In Japan there are ¥100 stores, which are kind of the same thing.  

My student and I were talking about clothes that are very cheap. I said it feels good to get a sweater for a few dollars, but you get what you pay for

Here is the definition of “You get what you pay for” From Wiktionary.org - In commercial transactions, the quality of goods and services increases as the prices increase, i.e., the more one pays, the better the merchandise. 

Very simply this means the price you pay relates to the quality of the goods.

So if you pay a high price, the thing you buy will be probably be high quality. If you pay a low price, the thing that you buy will be lower quality. It won't last very long or it will damage easily.

πŸ’² If you buy something from the Dollar store, the quality of whatever you bought will not be very good because the price is so low.


English idiom You get what you pay for

My student understood the feeling, but he wasn't sure about the word probably.

"the thing you bought will be probably be high quality"

Probably is an adverb used to show how likely something is to happen or be true.
πŸ’¬
*Quick pronunciation note! 

The word probably has 3 syllables - 

PRAW-BAB-LEE 

but a native speaker, talking at natural speed will often reduce the word to 2 syllables - (I do this all the time!)


PRAW-BLEE

"I’ll probably be late for dinner tonight, I have a meeting after work." 


πŸ’¬

An easy way to understand probability is with a simple chart. This is what I showed my student.


learn English probability

definitely 100% I'm very confident that this is true

probably 70-80% I'm confident that this is true

maybe 50% This could be true or not true

If we say definitely...
We are very confident that something will happen or something is true. Our confidence is 100%.

Learn to use the adverb 'definitely' in English

"If you buy a cheap computer, you will definitely have problems after a year or two. Cheap electronics never last." 

A: “Do you think Toyota makes quality cars?”
B: “Definitely. That company has a long history of making cars that perform well and last a long time.”

If we say maybe...
We feel something may happen or may be true. Our confidence is around the middle. 50%


Learn to use the adverb 'maybe' in English

A: “Will you join us for a drink on Friday?”
B: “Maybe. I'm not sure if my boss wants us to work overtime or not. I'll call you tomorrow at 5:00 and let you know.”

Probably is somewhere between Definitely and Maybe. Our confidence level is more than 50%, but not quite 100%.


Learn to use the adverb 'probably' in English

“If you pay a high price, the thing you buy will be probably be high quality.”


 πŸŽ4 BONUS examples!🎁

Frank: “This coffee tastes awful!”
Leon: “It was 75 cents, what do you expect! You get what you pay for.”

“I don’t mind to pay a little more for organic vegetables, they are healthy and they don’t use dangerous chemicals. They’re expensive but you get what you pay for.”


“I was happy to find these shoes for such a low price, but they fell apart after 3 weeks. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised. You get what you pay for.”


“Your computer always crashes because it’s junk. You should have spent more money and got a good brand, you get what you pay for.”


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From this post:
"I'm from Canada, I used to live in a town near Toronto." 
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--> I mentioned the kind of discount stores we have in Canada and Japan earlier in this post, tell me about where you live! Are there discount stores in your town? What kind of things can you buy there? Let me know in the comments. 


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Support of this blog content from:
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/you_get_what_you_pay_for



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❓Do you know how to use the verb “QUALIFY?” 
⚽The 2018 World Cup is starting soon!  Will you watch it? 
πŸ†Let's learn some #English from the World Cup! 
 πŸ“šLearn 4 uses with 15 natural sentence examples!
https://808english.blogspot.com/2018/06/world-cup-english-vocabulary-qualify.html


English grammar - Use 'should' 
to give your opinion 
πŸ’¬Make suggestions in conversation! 
πŸ“Over 20 natural example sentences! 
http://808english.blogspot.com/2018/05/give-your-opinion-in-English.html 

2018 World Cup English vocabulary - "Qualify" (4 uses! 15 natural sentence examples!)


The 2018 World Cup starts June 14th! 
Is the World Cup popular in your country?
Will you watch it?

2018 FIFA World Cup.svg
By Source, Fair use, Link

This week I want to teach you a word that we can use to talk about the World Cup.

This is an update of a blog post I wrote 
for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil!

I'm from Canada but now I live in Japan. Canada didn't qualify for the 2018 World Cup but Japan did. 
(Canada never qualifies 😭)


32 countries will participate in the 2018 World Cup in Russia. This means 32 countries qualified for the 2018 World Cup.

Let's look at the verb qualify today:

Qualify has a few meanings. We will look at 4 of them in today's post. Definitions updated with Oxford Learners Dictionaries
This is a great site for English learners and I use it
with all my students here in Japan.

 to give someone the skills and knowledge they need to do something

qualify somebody (for something) 
⟡"This training course will qualify you for a better job."

qualify somebody to do something 
⟡"The test qualifies you to drive heavy vehicles."


The test qualifies you to drive heavy vehicles

to have or give somebody the right to do something 

⟡"If you live in the area, you qualify for a parking permit."

⟡"To qualify, you must have lived in this country for at least three years."

⟡"I have lived in Japan for 12 years. I now qualify for permanent residency." 

*permanent residency = permission to reside (live) in a new country permanently (forever)


I now qualify for permanent residency

to have the right qualities to be described as a particular thing

"It's an old building, but that doesn't qualify it as an ancient monument!"

*We can use the past participle of a verb as an adjective.

simple present - qualify
simple past - qualified
past participle - qualified

You often hear the adjective qualified used in natural conversation.

= having passed the exams or completed the training that is necessary in order to do a particular job; having the experience to do a particular job

"Dave is a native speaker with many years of teaching experience, he is a qualified English teacher."

A: "What do you think of the president's new import and export laws? Are they good for our businesses?"
B: "I don't know very much about international trade law so I don't feel qualified to comment."


Confusing verbs (past tense) 
and adjectives.

A lot of my private students in Japan and online with Skype have some difficulty using these different word forms because the spelling is the same. Here is a simple rule for knowing if the word is being used as a verb or an adjective.

Verbs will (usually) come after a subject:

Morocco qualified for the 2018 World Cup.

My school qualified for the national championship tournament

Adjectives will (usually) come after the verb to be (and sometimes after an adverb)

⟡Bill and Mike are not qualified to fix hybrid car engines.

⟡Dave is a highly qualified English teacher.


⚽World Cup⚽

~ For competitions like the World Cup, qualify means to be of a high enough standard (level) to enter a competition

I'm from Canada but now I live in Japan. Canada didn't qualify for the World Cup but Japan did.

My school qualified for the national championship tournament! I'm so excited!

⟡The International Gymnastics Federation has published a step by step guide on how to qualify for the 2020 summer Olympics.

So... Canada's national soccer team is not at a high enough level to enter the World Cup but Japan's team is. How about your country? Who do you cheer for? Tell me in the comments!


2018 world cup qualification.PNG

More 2018 World Cup English is coming!


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Do you believe  ⧬  Can you believe - Learn the difference!
・Real student question! πŸ‘©πŸ’¬
・Video, images and lots of examples! πŸ“ΊπŸ–ΌπŸ—Ž
https://808english.blogspot.com/2016/11/do-you-believe-vs-can-you-believe.html

Might have (might've) VS Should have (should've)
• Updated blog post for 2018 ⇧
• Simple and clear explanations πŸ‘
• Audio for listening practice! 🎧
http://808english.blogspot.com/2017/01/might-have-mightve-vs-should-have.html

English grammar - Use 'should' to give your opinion (or make a suggestion!)

English use You should take an umbrella

We practiced giving our opinion in my post 
"Share your ideas and opinion in English!" 
Click the button below if you haven't seen it yet! 


The word should is commonly used when we want to give our opinion or make a suggestion. We're saying that something is good or the right thing to do.

"It may rain this afternoon. You should take an umbrella." = Taking an umbrella is a good idea - because if it rains you will need it

"Wow it's already 1:00 am. I should go to bed." = It's a good idea if I go to bed now - because it's late


should

Should is used to share our idea or opinion, so it’s common to use it with “I think…” or “I don’t think…”

"It may rain this afternoon. I think you should take an umbrella." 

“It’s after 9:00 pm, I don’t thinkshould drink any more coffee. It will be hard to sleep!”


should

If we ask someone's opinion or idea we put should at the beginning of the sentence to make it a question.

"There will be many people coming to our party. Should we buy more wine?"



Pat: “I'm going to Sao Paulo Brazil in August, should I bring a jacket?”
Alex: “Yes. August is winter in Sao Paulo. The weather is still nice (compared to Canada's winter!) but it can get cool at night.”

We can also ask:
“I'm going to Sao Paulo Brazil in August, do you think I should bring a jacket?”

* Remember should is only a suggestion, it is not as strong as must or have to.

 "We must buy more wine, I don't want to run out again like last time."  "We have to buy more wine, I don't want to run out again like last time."
"You can never have too much wine!"


Should pt. 2

We sometimes use should to show something is strange or different than you expect.

"It's almost 11:30, the pizza should be here by now." = I expected the pizza to arrive before now.

“I saw a dog running loose in the park this morning. All dogs should be on a leash in a public park.” = It’s strange to see a dog running free in a public park.

“There is a mistake on this flyer. It should say ‘One Week Only.’ We need to fix this.”


It's a big mistake!
You should call the printer right away!

 "I ordered a new carpet 3 weeks ago, it should have arrived by now." = 3 weeks is a long time to wait and my new carpet hasn't arrived yet. It's longer than I expected.

⇜⇝
We sometimes use should to show that we expect something to happen.

Greg has worked for the company for a long time and he is a good employee. He should get a promotion soon. = I expect Greg to get a promotion because he has done a good job at the company for a long time.

"Adam’s train arrives at 3:00. The train station is small so it shouldn’t be hard to see him." = I expect it will not be difficult to find at Adam at the train station because the station is small.


⇜⇝
We can also use the negative shouldn’t when we give advice or make a suggestion.

"You shouldn’t eat that yogurt, it's been in the fridge for 3 weeks."


"Eat this yogurt instead, I just bought it this morning!"

"Mike shouldn’t drink too much at the office party on Saturday. He might say something stupid to the boss! Remember last year?"

“Women who are pregnant shouldn’t smoke. Actually no one should smoke! It’s bad for your health!”


⇜⇝
Shouldn’t plus have can be used to show regret. To show that you feel bad because of something you did. This is used for past actions.

 "I shouldn't have eaten so much pizza at dinner! Now I have a stomach ache." = I regret eating so much pizza! It was a mistake and I feel bad now.

“Mitchel shouldn't have bought that car. He used all his savings and now he can’t pay for university!” = Mitchel will regret spending all his savings on the car because now he has no money to pay his school tuition!

*We can also use should have to show the same feeling if we change the action in our sentence to show what was a good thing to do (in our opinion)


“Mitchel should have saved his money to pay for university!”

All helpful word definitions in this post are from https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/




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the Passive Voice in English!
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Idiom "All over the place" - English from the World Cup 2018 - (10 example sentences)

English idiom - All over the place By Source, Fair use , Link The World Cup is a big event! This year's tournament will ha...

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